By Jill

Every year the Oxford English Dictionary adds new words. Some make sense to us and some…well….don’t.

Here are a few words that I think we all know, but aren’t sure should be officially added as “words” to the dictionary.

  1. Mansplain– I hear people talk about this all the time. It’s when a man feels like he has to over explain something to you because he thinks you are too stupid to know what he’s trying to say. ::eyeroll: In fact, this is so far from a word, that my spell check doesn’t even know what I’m trying to say as I type it.
  2. Hangry– This one I get, but although it’s obviously a take on the word hungry…I still don’t think it should be a word.
  3. Swag- I thought it was “swagger”, but what do I know. This means to walk with a style of that which has great confidence.
  4. Me Time– This is a saying not a word. ::facepalm:: This is wanting time for your self to recharge instead of doing things for others for an allotted period of time.
  5. Snowflake– I feel like this is a modern day take on the word “flaky”. It means to be overly sensitive or think you have some sense of entitlement.

Oh Oxford, how the mighty have fallen. You’ve come a long way since words like pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis.  The longest word in any of the major English language dictionaries is pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis, “a word that refers to a lung disease contracted from the inhalation of very fine silica particles, specifically from a volcano; medically, it is the same as silicosis.”

Say that three times fast.

 

 

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